How to Find Your Niche in 4 Short Steps

How to find your niche in four steps

Blogging can change your life and choosing the right niche is key to your success.

 

You can monetise your passion with blogging. In 2009 we monetised our fantasy football blog (on English Premier League). Fantasy Football! A game people play just for fun and people paid for our advice as we were an authority on the subject.

 

“Content marketing without a loyal audience is not content marketing at all.” – Joe Pulizzi

 

I am convinced that almost anything can be monetized online if you have passion and can build a captive audience. Gary Vaynerchuck and Joe Pulizzi regularly speak about this too with each building successful businesses off the back of it.

 

“Skills are cheap. Passion is priceless.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

 

So looking to start a blog? You need a niche before you start you should try to pick the right niche following the simple steps outlined below:

 

Introducing the 2008 Version of myself:

 

1. List your Skills, Talents, and Experience

 

Everyone has skills, talents and some experience, what are yours? Simply list them.

 

Don’t worry if your list is short, this is only the first step.

 

e.g. Paul Caffrey in 2008

  • Science Degree (Microbiology & minor in Computer Science)
  • Talented Footballer, although consistent knee injuries stopped me playing.
  • From Dublin, lived in California and London.
  • Qualified Referee

 

2. List Your Passions

 

Find your passion, find your niche. What are you truly passionate about, what would you talk about for free? What would you speak to friends about? Include everything in this list.

 

e.g. Paul Caffrey in 2008

  • Premier League football
  • Fantasy Football
  • Golf
  • Research Science
  • Technology

3. What Problems can you solve?

 

So once you have completed the two lists, scrutinise them. Now look at the problems that people might have within these

 

e.g. Paul Caffrey in 2008

  • Helping people pick players for their fantasy football team
  • Explaining complex scientific research in layman terms.
  • Explain how new technology works
  • Create study guides for people studying Microbiology and Computer Science in University
  • Explain referee decisions in high profile premier league games.

 

4. Market Size & Will people pay for the problem to be solved?

 

This is difficult to gauge but you can certainly estimate it. A simple estimation with basic numbers is better than paying this no consideration at all.

 

e.g. Paul Caffrey in 2008

  • Helping people pick players for their fantasy football team (2.5 Million Weekly Players with 38 weekly decisions to make) (Market Size: Large, Will People Pay? Low, but yes some will)
  • Explaining complex scientific research in layman terms. (Popular Science Magazine has around 130k weekly sales, online difficult to quantify) (Market Size: Large, Will People Pay? No – Advertising?)
  • Explain how new technology works (millions of people interested in this) (Market Size: Large, Will People Pay? No – Advertising?)
  • Create study guides for people studying Microbiology in University (Around 40 people per year graduate from top universities studying this ) (Market Size: Small, Will People Pay? University Students usually don’t have much extra cash)
  • Explain referee decisions in high profile premier league games. (Often 3-4 per round of games, most fans make their own assessment) (Market Size: Large, Will People Pay? No – Advertising?)

 

Your list will probably be better than mine was in 2008, I had just graduated from college and had little life experience at that point.

 

Although a free game, people want to beat their friends and office colleagues at fantasy football. With such a high volume of players, weekly decisions, my passion for football and the game along with my experience playing at a high level when younger.

 

Fantasy Football was the right decision to make because a small percentage of players would pay for additional advice.

 

Action

Find your niche today! Sit down with a pen and paper and go through the four steps above asking yourself, what skills, talents, and expertise do I have? What am I passionate about? What problems can I solve and how big is the market and will people pay to have this problem solved.

 

It shouldn’t take any more than 20 minutes to sit down and go through it.

 

Need Help? Comment Below or email me directly at paul@content.academy

 

It is important to realise that we are focusing on building a brand based on our passion.

 

Now that you have a list of topics, how do you know which one is right for you?

 

 

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About the author, Paul

Co-Founder of Content Academy, Started Online Business in 2008, Cloud Specialist, personal development pushes me forward everyday #powerful